yalandarose

March 4, 2013

Seeing Halos

Filed under: children — Tags: , , , — yalandarose @ 9:24 pm

My daughter is a part-time angel who’s off on weekends.

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October 26, 2012

You’re Officially a Parent When…

Filed under: life, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — yalandarose @ 11:03 am

freedigitalphotos.net

Your child repeatedly awakens you to answer questions, and with the exception of peeking one eye open for “suspicious” inquiries, you can answer each one without interrupting your sleep.

September 4, 2012

Nothing but the truth

Filed under: child abuse, children, Christianity — Tags: , , — yalandarose @ 5:59 pm

I know, I know. It’s been awhile.

If I was trying to gain new readers and followers, I failed to follow blog marketing basics of posting regularly and predictably.

Like many bloggers (I know because I’ve read enough), my day became brighter by the lights of my status updates:  likes, followers, and the apparently once-in-a lifetime – re-blog notifications. Logging in to a dark homepage was discouraging and well, dark.  My status headlights had become an obsession, and I was driven to increase my traffic.

My blog had slowly evolved to posting about God’s Word to revolving around me.

To increase my views, I did everything short of posting, “Look at me, look at me, look at me!”

Until God Made me look at this – a nocturnal photo of 2 young siblings obviously homeless and abandoned. The youngest child probable age 2 had made his bed in his older brother’s lap probable age 4, as the oldest clutched to a probable bag of their belongings –  a bag small enough to throw away.

I thought of posting the photo on this post to justify the length of my absence by the speed in which my heart broke.  However, those kids had been exploited enough.

Though a picture is worth a thousand words, the heart-breaking photo I viewed recently on another blog post required only a couple to get my attention – stay focused – on God’s true religion.

“religion pure and undefiled with the God and Father is this, to look after orphans and widows in their tribulation — unspotted to keep himself from the world.”  James 1:27

People spend their whole lives looking for the “truth” when it’s in the first chapter of a book named James. If only those people knew, they could quit looking for the “truth” and start looking after children and elderly who are hungry, homeless, neglected, abused and scared.

That one look made even my best day for page views mean nothing, especially when I know nothing else about the fate of those kids.

Organizations ask us to save the world, the animals, and even the economy. However, God Requires us to save the vulnerable.

Act like a child to get near to God (Matthew 19:14). Give when the adult in us says don’t share. Forgive, when the adult in us says to hold grudges. Love when the adult in us says it’s easier to hate.

Quit searching the world over for the truth, when the truth may be at your doorstep, backyard or next door.

July 26, 2012

Dry Your Eyes

Filed under: Christianity — Tags: , , — yalandarose @ 9:49 pm

“Crying isn’t going to make me do it any faster!”

Is what my daughter hears between sobs when her request elevates to demands in a few hot seconds.

Considering that this is a regular occurrence, I marvel that she is still not aware that I fully intend to fulfill her original request before she hypes into diva-mode.

Now, I have to stop to teach her a 4-part lesson in patience.

  1. Wipe your face
  2. Take a deep breath
  3. Ask politely.
  4. Say thank-you.

Immediately, I instruct my daughter to stop crying because I want her full attention.

If necessary, I ask her to take a deep breath to organize her thoughts. I then instruct her to phrase her request into a question. And before she runs off with her request fulfilled and no memory of this event ever occurring, I remind her to say thank you.

I learned how childish I was acting  as I was sobbing about another day and no job offer.  I have been praying for nearly 2 years for a better job, and I cranked into diva mode today.

Then I realized, crying isn’t going to make my Father Answer my prayers any faster. So I wiped my face, took a deep breath, continue to ask Him nicely remembering His Sovereignty, and when He does respond, I will thank Him -again.

July 24, 2012

For giving.

Filed under: Christianity, Faith, God's Love — Tags: , , , , , — yalandarose @ 8:09 am

As a parent, there are a lot of things I teach my daughter about life.  As a child, there are a lot of things she teaches me about love.

I have to own up to some of my wrongs against her:

  • false accusation (I was just sure she made another mess)
  • losing my temper and/or patience (don’t worry, I always find it)
  • inflicting pain (I honestly didn’t see her when I turned around)

When I consider what I owe my daughter for my wrongs, all I can do is apologize.

Her response?  “That’s OK mommy, I just love you.” (I could go on and on about how wonderful of a mom she says I am, but I guess it’s unnecessary to mention it here:)

Lesson learned? My daughter has forgiven my debts as God Has Forgiven mine.

Thankfully, God Loves us both too.

June 25, 2012

Collective Prayer

Filed under: child abuse, children, God's Love — Tags: , , — yalandarose @ 1:36 pm

Please pray for the 10-year old malnourished girl locked in the closet.  May God Have Mercy on her.

http://news.yahoo.com/police-rescue-malnourished-girl-closet-kansas-city-161117342–abc-news-topstories.html

May 13, 2011

Birthday Parties Are No Piece of Cake!

Filed under: children — Tags: , , — yalandarose @ 6:42 pm

Out of bed on a Saturday morning, I grabbed my chore list planned on a not-much-happening Friday night.  Clean my car, mop my floors, run some errands.  What I hadn’t planned, but now needed to address, was learning the complicated politics of children’s birthday parties.

The sheer amount of papers my child brings home from school has my Mazda’s floorboards littered like a big city sidewalk.  While purging my car of paper, stickers and melted candies, I came across an invitation-sized envelope labeled with my daughter’s name.

“Guess who’s turning 6?” It read with enough details about where Jeremy lived, how to reach him and what he liked that I could have stolen his identity, but I still didn’t have a clue.  Jeremy –  a boy?  I wasn’t even aware that my preschool daughter even had boy – friends?

“Hi.” I introduced myself awkwardly to Jeremy’s dad on the phone as if we had just started going steady. “My daughter was invited to your son’s birthday party this afternoon.  It’s a long, messy story, but I just found about the party today…is it too late?”

“No, we’d love to have you, come join the fun!” Why did I have the feeling that his response should have been followed by a big fat NOT!

My daughter’s only 4, so my experience is minimal in planning and attending kids’ birthday parties, and because she wasn’t blessed with a fraternal twin brother, I have zero experience in picking out boy items. It seems easy enough on the surface.  If girls like princesses, shouldn’t boys like princes?  Hmm, maybe I should think this through.  Oh well, I’ll have to contemplate this later, I still have 2 more items on my list.

Three hours later and an hour before the “fun” starts, I’m studying the toys on the shelves like the names on a memorial wall.  A toy I would have deemed appropriate for a 6-year-old boy wasn’t among those listed. I still lacked peace of mind.

Thirty minutes to fun time, I grabbed what I thought was an age-appropriate gift -an educational card game with a squishy toy on top. Well, let’s just hope shopping for the gift bag is going to be easier.

It was. A dark blue tote that screamed ‘energetic big boy’ with the words “YOU ROCK!” emblazoned across.  I completed the look with black and gray tissue paper to create the smoky effect similar to when rockers appear on stage.

In the parking lot of Party Central, I started doubting my gift. I really didn’t know what Jeremy liked or what he even looked like, so I opted not to put our names on the gift tag. Besides, I reasoned, with all the other gifts he was sure to get, mine would get lost in the shuffle anyway.

“For the birthday boy!” I announced handing the bag over like a bottle of wine at a dinner party to whom I assumed was Jeremy’s dad.

“Wow! What an awesome bag!  Honey, look at this!”  Jeremy’s dad said, summoning over his wife.

“Oh wow! Jeremy’s going to love this!” Jeremy’s mom agreed placing it in front of the other gifts.

Uh-oh.  There goes my logic of the crappy gift getting lost in the shuffle. I’m going to pay more for this gift than I did in the store.

After the games, cake, and candles, it was now time for Jeremy to cover the floor with wrapping paper and empty gift bags.

Thanks to my ego-boosting YOU ROCK bag complete with the smoky effect, I lowered my head as he raised my gift up for the birthday guests to see.

“Daddy, what is it?” Jeremy said as if he had just found a rusty doodad in the backyard.

It’s a…I don’t know son.” Jeremy’s dad attempted to answer as he passed the gift to his wife.

“Well, it’s a…um…”Jeremy’s mom said looking at me, hoping I would finish her sentence. I remained silent as I realized the squishy toy on top made the gift look like a plaything fit for Fido or Spot. Now, all the parents were looking and inwardly wondering how much I paid for the gift. I actually paid $15, but it was clear that it was $14 too much.

Jeremy’s mom handed the gift back to her husband in an impromptu game of Hot Potato, who for a second almost forgot I was standing there because he looked like he wanted to throw the rusty doodad back in the far away backyard.

Jeremy, with his 6-year-old attention span, was now oohing and ahhing over the other gifts he got while his parents remained noticeably silent. No one bothered to break the ice that abruptly chilled the leased party room, so I knew that the other parents were making mental notes to themselves as well.

I hid behind a moon bouncer and pretended to be busy texting on my phone.  I’m an adult playing with imaginary friends.  When this party’s over, I’m going to need therapy.

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